A sabayon is a sauce thickened with eggs. The grand-daddy of these sauces is Hollandaise. Here is the classic.

Ingredients

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon cream
  • 1 cup (1/2 pound) melted butter, cooled to room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice or white wine vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • Dash of cayenne pepper

Directions

Use a small, thick ceramic bowl set in a heavy-bottomed pan, or a heavyweight double boiler. Off the heat, put the egg yolks and cream in the bowl or upper section of the double boiler and stir with a wire whisk until well-blended — the mixture should never be beaten but stirred, evenly, vigorously and continually.

Place the container over hot water (if you are setting the bowl in water, there should be about 1 1/2 inches of water in the pan; in a double boiler, the water should not touch the top section). Stirring eggs continuously, bring the water slowly to a simmer. Do not let it boil. Stir, incorporating the entire mixture so there is no film at the bottom. When the eggs have thickened to consistency of very heavy cream, begin to add the cooled melted butter with one hand, stirring vigorously with the other. Pour extremely slowly so that each addition is blended into the egg mixture before more is added. When all the butter has been added, add the lemon juice or vinegar a drop at a time and immediately remove from heat. Add salt and a mere dash of cayenne.

Notes

If you proceed with care your Hollandaise should not curdle ("break", in chef's jargon). If it does, however, don't despair. Finish adding the butter as best you can. Remove sauce to a small bowl, clean the pot and put a fresh egg yolk in it. Start over again, using the curdled sauce as if it were the butter.

Another way to save a broken sauce is to whisk in water, a couple of drops at a time.

Categories
30 Minute, Sauces
MacGourmet downloadHollandaise Sauce. To import, drag image to your MacGourmet recipe box.

Source

Servings/Yield

Difficulty

Cuisine

Course